Use strong verbs. Avoid weak verbs.

Dewey defeats Truman
Use active verbs to tell almost every nonfiction story.

Past tense
Present tense
Future tense
Active 
We completed the project.
We did complete it.
We did complete the project.
We complete the project.
Are we completing it?
We will complete the project.
Will we complete it?
Passive
The project was completed.
Was the project completed?
The project is completed.
Is the project completed?
Will the project be completed?
The project will be completed.
Active
He designed the shoes.
He did design the shoes.
He designs the shoes.
Should he design the shoes?
He will design the shoes.
Will he design the shoes?
Passive
The shoes were designed.
The shoes were designed by him.
The shoes are designed.
The shoes are designed by him.
The shoes will be designed.
Will the shoes be designed?
Active
You kissed the bride.
Did you kiss the bride?
You kiss the bride.
You do kiss the bride.
Everyone kisses the bride.
You will kiss the bride.
Will you kiss the bride?
Passive 
The bride was kissed.
By whom was the bride kissed?
The bride is kissed.
Is the bride being kissed?
By whom is the bride being kissed?
The bride will be kissed.
The bride will be kissed
by her lecherous uncle.

 

Wield active verbs

A verb expresses an action, a condition or a state of being. A verb acts, does something or exists. I call the person who commits the verb the perpetrator and the person or thing that receives the action the victim. Whether you are writing for print or electronic media, for resumes or websites, use the active voice as often as possible.
 

Active verbs
Passive verbs
The subject performs the action.
The subject is acted upon by someone.
Require fewer words.
Require more words.
Are more personal.
Are less personal.
Are more direct.
Are more indirect.
Convey conviction and responsibility.
Mute the activity; lack authority; suggest doubt.
Identify and emphasize the perpetrator.
Make the subject the perpetrator of the verb.
Excel for writing news and information.
Excel for communicating bad news.
Focus on the perpetrator of the verb.
Hide/protect/minimize the perpetrator of the verb.
Identify the perpetrator of the verb.
Emphasize the victim of the action/verb.
Tell the truth, the whole truth.
Smooth political situations and ruffled feathers.

    “When men read rape-and-battery stories written in the passive voice, they attribute less blame to the perpetrator – and less harm to the victim – than when reading the active-voice versions. The reason? Probably, says Nancy Henley, PhD, because passive-voice sentences don’t mention the attacker. As a result, male readers ignore the perpetrator and blame the victim.” According to Psychology Today, Spring 1995, based on research at UCLA.