3 little words make a hendiatris

A hendiatris is a figure of speech in which 3 consecutive words express a central idea.

Examples of a hendiatris (pronounce it hen DIE a triss) include:

  • “Be sincere, be brief, be seated.” [President Franklin Roosevelt’s advice for speakers.]
  • “Citius, Altius, Fortius.” [Olympic motto meaning “Faster, higher, stronger]
  • “Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité.” [French motto meaning “Liberty, Equality, Fraternity”]
  • “Veni, vidi, vici.” [Julius Caesar’s boast: “I came. I saw. I conquered.”]
  • “Wine, women, and song.” [Anonymous]

Writing tip: Use a hendriatis to add pizzazz to your writing.

How to incorporate threes into your nonfiction writing.

More about incorporating threes into your nonfiction writing.

Fall 2017 classes at Temple University

I have no idea what this means.

Ready to learn more about writing nonfiction? 
Now’s your chance. 

Write Your Personal Blog
https://noncredit.temple.edu/search/publicCourseSearchDetails.do?method=load&courseId=9063158

Grammar for Grownups
https://noncredit.temple.edu/search/publicCourseSearchDetails.do?method=load&courseId=90682

Business Writing Essentials: Random Acts of Writing
https://noncredit.temple.edu/search/publicCourseSearchDetails.do?method=load&courseId=8989791

Please sign up at the link. Please holler if you have any questions. 

Need to improve your writing?

Let Susan help

never place a period

You need to train your employees to write if

  • They write such poor reports that you rewrite every sentence before forwarding.
  • They produce documents that reflect poorly on you and the company.
  • It costs money and time to scrutinize every manuscript.
  • You wish your staff would agree on writing styles for your department or organization.
  • They have great ideas for writing projects but cannot implement them.
  • They have brilliant ideas but only a passing relationship with grammar.
  • They write professionally and are eager to move to the next level.

People in any position benefit from writing training

  • Chief executive officers
  • Directors of nonprofit organizations
  • Leadership teams
  • Top- and mid-level managers
  • High-potential individuals
  • Individual contributors
  • Administrative assistants and other support staff
  • People in any field benefit from writing training
  • Architects, engineers and designers
  • Human-resource specialists
  • Lawyers and judges
  • MBAs
  • Physicians, healthcare administrators and patient-care specialists
  • Public relations specialists, staff writers, editors
  • Technical specialists who communicate with non-tech staff
  • Support staff

Call me for customized workshops that help your staff gain skill and confidence as writers.

My workshops are both useful and entertaining, since people need to be engaged in order to learn. Each session includes instructive presentations and discussions at the basic, intermediate and advanced levels.

Make your computer work for you, Part 2


More tips for using Microsoft Word 2010 to your advantage.

  • Organize your files.
    • You can save every file in your Word software without organization, just as you keep masking tape, scissors, bottle openers, loose keys, birthday candles, expired coupons and random corks in the junk drawer in the kitchen. Or you can organize. I recommend organizing Word files. Find someone else for your junk drawer.
  • Establish and use directories. 
    • Find organizing principles for your docs. Memos, meetings and management is too vague. Human resources, finance and software might work – as long as you don’t work in human resources, finance or software. If you freelance or consult, consider organizing by client name, service provided and your own office management. 
    • By default, Word organizes your files in alphabetical order. 
      • If you want often-used files to appear at the top of the alphabet, type an exclamation point (!) or a digit at the beginning of the file name, with or without a space following. Be consistent on using or skipping that space. 
      • If you want rarely used files to appear at the bottom of the alphabet, type z at the beginning of the file name.
    • When searching for particular files, you can switch to sorting files by date – ascending (from oldest to newest) or descending (from newest to oldest) – or by file type or size.
      • Click Control O to open all documents. 
      • On the top right, mouse over the third icon from the right, called “change your view.” Click the drop-down arrow. Scroll down to “details.” Choose “ascending” or “descending.”
      • Change it back at your convenience. 
  • Notice the tools on your tool bar that you have never used. 
    • Strike-through on the tool bar. Highlight the letters or words you might want to cross out. Then hit Strike-through. 
    • Shrink to fit.
      • To shrink the document to one page, click on File, then Print Preview.
      • On the Print Preview screen, click on the seventh icon from the left: three tiny pages, the left one darker than the others, with an arrow point from left to right.
      • That function prevent a document from printing  an additional page.
      • Note: To shrink the document, Microsoft Word decreases the size of each font used in the document.
    • To add the Shrink-to-fit icon to the toolbar
      • Right click on an empty space in the toolbar.
      • From the drop-down list, choose the last item, Customize.
      • From the list of Categories, choose Tools.
      • Scroll down the list of Commands until you find the icon (called here) Shrink one page.
      • Drag the icon to the toolbar.

Read more tips

 

Write great beginnings

north-of-here-seattle
Journalists call story openings “ledes.”

Whether you call them beginnings, openings or ledes, you need to agonize over them – because you have about 250 words to grab your readers.

“Begin at the beginning,” the King said, gravely, “and go on ’till you come to the end. Then stop.” Lewis Carroll.

Up top, identify the message of the e-mail, web page or article. Learn new ways to begin a piece of writing. “A lead ought to shine like a flashlight, down into the whole piece, if possible,” says John McPhee.

Avoid these bland, trite leads

  • An apology or complaint: As you probably know….
  • A panorama or vague overview: Urban sprawl is a problem each of us faces every day.
  • A truism, a cliché, the obvious or platitudes: We are dedicated to being the world’s best at bringing people together – giving them easy access to each other and to the information and services they want and need – anytime, anywhere.
  • The Adam-and-Eve approach: Back when the company was founded….
  • There’s good news and there’s bad news….
  • A dictionary definition.
  • To whom it may concern.
  • Dear Sir or Madam.
  • Enclosed (or attached) please find.
  • It has come to my attention.