3 little words make a hendiatris

A hendiatris is a figure of speech in which 3 consecutive words express a central idea.

Examples of a hendiatris (pronounce it hen DIE a triss) include:

  • “Be sincere, be brief, be seated.” [President Franklin Roosevelt’s advice for speakers.]
  • “Citius, Altius, Fortius.” [Olympic motto meaning “Faster, higher, stronger]
  • “Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité.” [French motto meaning “Liberty, Equality, Fraternity”]
  • “Veni, vidi, vici.” [Julius Caesar’s boast: “I came. I saw. I conquered.”]
  • “Wine, women, and song.” [Anonymous]

Writing tip: Use a hendriatis to add pizzazz to your writing.

How to incorporate threes into your nonfiction writing.

More about incorporating threes into your nonfiction writing.

Fall 2017 classes at Temple University

I have no idea what this means.

Ready to learn more about writing nonfiction? 
Now’s your chance. 

Write Your Personal Blog
https://noncredit.temple.edu/search/publicCourseSearchDetails.do?method=load&courseId=9063158

Grammar for Grownups
https://noncredit.temple.edu/search/publicCourseSearchDetails.do?method=load&courseId=90682

Business Writing Essentials: Random Acts of Writing
https://noncredit.temple.edu/search/publicCourseSearchDetails.do?method=load&courseId=8989791

Please sign up at the link. Please holler if you have any questions. 

Boost your creativity with these 7 tips

Ignore the warnings, even if you can read them. Create!

When you have a good idea, ignore everybody else’s input.

  • At the moment you create it, you don’t know whether your concept has merit – but neither does anyone else. Do you have a strong gut feeling that it’s valuable? Then trust your feelings, whether your idea delights or scares you.
  • Hold onto and polish your good ideas, in life and when writing nonfiction.
  • Put the hours in. Doing anything worthwhile takes forever. Succeed by investing time, effort and stamina. Being good at anything is like figure skating – it just looks easy.
  • Everyone is born with the possibility of creativity. Nurture that openness in yourself and your children.
    Be creative for your own sake, not for anyone else’s.
  • Find your own voice. A Picasso always looks like Picasso painted it. Hemingway always sounds like Hemingway. A Beethoven Symphony always sounds like Beethoven. What’s your voice?
  • If you have the creative urge, it won’t go away. Learn to accept it. Listen to it. Feel it. Accept it. Give into it. Be creative.

Destroy your imagination with these 6 notions.

  • “The ordinary ‘horseless carriage’ is at present a luxury for the wealthy; and although its price will probably fall in the future, it will never, of course, come into as common use as the bicycle.”
    Literary Digest, 1899
  • “There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home.”
    Ken Olson, president, chairman and founder of Digital Equipment Corp., 1977
  • “I think there is a world market for maybe five computers.”
    Thomas Watson, chairman of IBM, 1943
  • “We don’t like their sound, and guitar music is on the way out.”
    Decca Recording Co. rejecting the Beatles, 1962
  • “There is not the slightest indication that nuclear energy will ever be obtainable. It would mean that the atom would have to be shattered at will.”
    Albert Einstein, 1932
  • “This ‘telephone’ has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication. The device is inherently of no value to us.”
    Western Union internal memo, 1876

Make your computer work for you, Part 2


More tips for using Microsoft Word 2010 to your advantage.

  • Organize your files.
    • You can save every file in your Word software without organization, just as you keep masking tape, scissors, bottle openers, loose keys, birthday candles, expired coupons and random corks in the junk drawer in the kitchen. Or you can organize. I recommend organizing Word files. Find someone else for your junk drawer.
  • Establish and use directories. 
    • Find organizing principles for your docs. Memos, meetings and management is too vague. Human resources, finance and software might work – as long as you don’t work in human resources, finance or software. If you freelance or consult, consider organizing by client name, service provided and your own office management. 
    • By default, Word organizes your files in alphabetical order. 
      • If you want often-used files to appear at the top of the alphabet, type an exclamation point (!) or a digit at the beginning of the file name, with or without a space following. Be consistent on using or skipping that space. 
      • If you want rarely used files to appear at the bottom of the alphabet, type z at the beginning of the file name.
    • When searching for particular files, you can switch to sorting files by date – ascending (from oldest to newest) or descending (from newest to oldest) – or by file type or size.
      • Click Control O to open all documents. 
      • On the top right, mouse over the third icon from the right, called “change your view.” Click the drop-down arrow. Scroll down to “details.” Choose “ascending” or “descending.”
      • Change it back at your convenience. 
  • Notice the tools on your tool bar that you have never used. 
    • Strike-through on the tool bar. Highlight the letters or words you might want to cross out. Then hit Strike-through. 
    • Shrink to fit.
      • To shrink the document to one page, click on File, then Print Preview.
      • On the Print Preview screen, click on the seventh icon from the left: three tiny pages, the left one darker than the others, with an arrow point from left to right.
      • That function prevent a document from printing  an additional page.
      • Note: To shrink the document, Microsoft Word decreases the size of each font used in the document.
    • To add the Shrink-to-fit icon to the toolbar
      • Right click on an empty space in the toolbar.
      • From the drop-down list, choose the last item, Customize.
      • From the list of Categories, choose Tools.
      • Scroll down the list of Commands until you find the icon (called here) Shrink one page.
      • Drag the icon to the toolbar.

Read more tips

 

Write great beginnings

north-of-here-seattle
Journalists call story openings “ledes.”

Whether you call them beginnings, openings or ledes, you need to agonize over them – because you have about 250 words to grab your readers.

“Begin at the beginning,” the King said, gravely, “and go on ’till you come to the end. Then stop.” Lewis Carroll.

Up top, identify the message of the e-mail, web page or article. Learn new ways to begin a piece of writing. “A lead ought to shine like a flashlight, down into the whole piece, if possible,” says John McPhee.

Avoid these bland, trite leads

  • An apology or complaint: As you probably know….
  • A panorama or vague overview: Urban sprawl is a problem each of us faces every day.
  • A truism, a cliché, the obvious or platitudes: We are dedicated to being the world’s best at bringing people together – giving them easy access to each other and to the information and services they want and need – anytime, anywhere.
  • The Adam-and-Eve approach: Back when the company was founded….
  • There’s good news and there’s bad news….
  • A dictionary definition.
  • To whom it may concern.
  • Dear Sir or Madam.
  • Enclosed (or attached) please find.
  • It has come to my attention.